Saturday Schedule (view PDF)

8:45 – 9:30am Doors Open
9:30 – 10:20am Block #1
10:20 – 10:30am Break
10:30 – 11:20am Block #2
11:20 – 11:30am Break
11:30 – 12:20pm Block #3
12:20 – 1:00pm Lunch
1:00 – 1:50pm Block #4
1:50 – 2:00pm Break
2:00 – 2:50pm Block #5
2:50 – 3:00pm Break
3:00 – 3:50pm Block #6
3:50 – 4:00pm Break
4:00 – 4:30pm Closing Activities

Block #1
Presenter:
 J.A. Jance

Title: Character Building: The Case Against Protagonist A
 Description: Join J.A. Jance to learn more about how to deal with the complexities of creating believable fictional characters. You don’t just name them and forget them!

 

Block #2, Room 102
Presenter:
 Wayne Ude

Title: Who Are These People?: Characters and Characterization
Description: This session will explore various methods of showing character including appearance, action, dialogue, inner representation, reactions to other characters, reactions by other characters, commentary or interpretation by a narrator, tone—and any others which may come up.

Block #2, Room 104
Presenter:
 Joseph Ponepinto

Title: Unspoken: Using Subtext to give Meaning to Your Story
Description:  Charles Baxter calls subtext “the unspoken soul-matter” of a story. It is the invisible element that makes creative writing come alive with dimension and meaning. This session will combine lecture and workshop to lead students to a deeper understanding of what subtext is and how to incorporate it into their writing, both in dialogue and narrative. Students will discuss examples of subtext in fiction, and engage in exercises designed to illustrate its proper use.

Block #2, Room 105
Presenter: Wendy Kendall
Title: The Contemporary Cozy Mystery
Description:  Learn the ingredients of a successful Cozy, and specifically what it is that the contemporary, target audience is hungry for in their reading. Cozy Mysteries have evolved. Participants will spend a short time identifying where an element fits in their work-in-progress, and expanding that based on what we’ve discussed. You will come away with: The specific elements for today’s successful Cozy Mystery; an extensive list of Cozy Mystery resources and contacts, demographics, and industry trends; and, what pitfalls to avoid with contemporary Cozies.

Block #3, Room 102
Presenter:
Wayne Ude

Title: Point of View – 3rd Person
Description: We’ll explore and practice four levels of third person narration: limited, shifting, neutral omniscience, and editorial omniscience. Does third person really create a greater distance from characters but make giving information easier than in first person? Not necessarily.

Block #3, Room 104
Presenter:
 Jeff Leisawitz

Title: The Passion and Purpose of Creativity
Description: Whether you’re a writer, dancer, musician, entrepreneur, filmmaker, visual artist or any other flavor of creative— something drives your desire to express yourself. This roundtable discussion will touch on themes including: inspiring others; expressing truth; healing through creativity; and, mastering skills.

Block #3, Room 105
Presenter:
 Dean Wells

Title: The Rhythm of Fiction
Description: Narrative flow has three elements: 1. story rhythm to separate plot from random events; 2. equal parts action and reaction; and 3. either internal or external movement. In this session explore how these elements can be incorporated into your own stories.

Block #4, Room 102
Presenter:
 Wendy Kendall

Title: Layering Your Writing
Description: A story is like a great painting: they both reveal their core message through many enhancing layers. For instance, peel away the top layer and you get background information. Peel another layer and you get tension and atmosphere. Peel some more and you get deep emotion, empathy and immediacy. Another layer will reveal characterization, and more layers reveal pace, action and so on. The ability of the writer to layer these aspects – one on top of the other – is what gives stories and novels not only depth, but appeal. We’ll talk about how layering is done so that it gently persuades a readers’ imagination, never directs or demands.

Block #4, Room 104
Presenter:
 Dean Wells

Title: Character and Transformation
Description: Transformation in fiction is the reinvention of the self by the self. It represents your character’s search for wholeness. In this session we will discuss this integral process of the hero becoming a more complete human being.

Block #4, Room 105
Presenter:
 Mark Lindquist
Title: Subgenres of Mystery – Mystery, Detective, and Crime Novel Conventions

Description: Discussion of the rules and conventions of the mystery novel, the detective novel, and the literary crime novel. What traits distinguishes one from the other, how are they similar, which form best suits you and the story you want to tell or read? The market potential of each will be examined. This will be a dialogue more than a lecture so come prepared to discuss examples.

Block #5, Room 102
Presenter:
 Regina Sadono
Title: Science and Mythology in Story Structure
Description: What are the current thoughts on story structure and writing? How can you use the research of Lisa Cron, Chris Vogler, or Blake Snyder to help you approach your own writing? How can these theories help you develop the emotional arc of your protagonist, plot out the sequence of your story events, or structure conflict that will help your characters grow? This is an opportunity to understand how different but complimentary approaches to narrative structure and story design can work together – not only for writers to produce a great book or film, but for readers and viewers to better understand the inner workings of what makes a great story.

Block #5, Room 104
Presenter:
 Ryan Petty

Title: Craft an Author Business Plan in Ten Easy Steps
Description: his session is for writers who are (or would like to be) pragmatists about how to find readers and participate in the marketplace in a business-like way. It emphasizes a simple 10-step process based on two of the presenter’s nonfiction how-to books. The workshop is about how to create a substantive business plan for yourself as a writer, how to access the marketplace and use the most impactful technologies…and to do this in 10 days.

Block #5, Room 105
Presenter:
 EC Murray

Title: Family History or Memoir: Which Shall I Write?
Description: Confused about the terms memoir, family history, and biography? Start by deciding who you want your audience to be. Learn the similarities and differences of each genre. Whether you’re writing about your grandparents’ adventures or your personal transformation, you will learn how to: select significant scenes, infuse meaning behind the action, create tension, bring characters to life, weave reflection and backstory, and flesh out themes. A fun and practical workshop!

Block #6, Room 102
Presenter: Dean Wells

Title: The Ten Stages of Writing, Plus One 
Description: Writing is a process. No two authors employ the same one, but yet they all share core elements and techniques. In this session we will discuss the stages most commonly used in the development of a finished work, and what may happen next.

Block #6, Room 104
Presenter:
 Joseph Ponepinto

Title: Your Book’s Path to Publication
Description: This session will help you understand and manage the process of bringing a full-length work to publication, including how to decide whether traditional publishing or self-publishing avenues are best for you and your work. Specific information on publishing in a variety of genres (e.g. science fiction, romance, mystery, etc.) will be offered. Key points to be covered: Do you need an agent?; getting connected with agents and/or publishers; understanding publishing markets; traditional publishing deals and support; self-publishing options.

Block #6, Room 105
Presenter:
 Cathy Warner

Title: Scene Essentials
Description: Scenes are the heart of stories, the vivid events and images that expand time, heighten the senses, and engage a reader in both fiction and nonfiction. We’ll explore the elements and uses of scene, including dialogue, through discussion and examples, and learn how to apply them in our writing. The session will cover in detail the four basic scene elements as described in Sandra Scoffield’s The Scene Book.

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